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Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Lord of the Enduros
Dirk Thelen overcomes the hurdles of the Enduro d'Agadir atop the BMW F 850 GS
<p>For Dirk Thelen, things are only heading in one direction: forwards, onwards and upwards. Where other participants of the four-day long Enduro d’Agadir overcome rocky gravel, sandy pistes and wet-clay mud with their hard Enduros, the four-time German Enduro champion effortlessly sets the pace – atop the new F 850 GS. A long-distance touring enduro subjected to a brutal test and terrain, right through Morocco.  </p>
I chase excitement
Curiosity and enthusiasm are what drive Isaac Johnston
<p>He's his own boss. Years ago, Isaac Johnston traded his office job for a life as a storyteller and lifestyle photographer. Today, the American from Montana lives for unexpected experiences and loves exciting and inspiring places. Above all, nature holds a special allure for him.    </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
Back in Bavaria after India
Interview with Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design at BMW Motorrad
<p>After a brief stint in India, Edgar Heinrich returned to Munich to lead the BMW Motorrad design team. It was a happy return for the motorcycle enthusiast, who began his career at BMW in 1986. He spearheaded the design of many BMW motorcycles: the Paris-Dakar rally bike, the K 1200 S and R, the HP2 Enduro, the R 1150 GS, the R 1200 GS and most recently the S 1000 RR. </p> <p>Before his time at Indian automaker Bajaj, he was also involved in the design of the K 1600 GT and GTL touring bikes as well as the C 600 Sport and the C 650 GT maxi scooter. All of them were successful products that expanded the horizons of this established market segment and attracted many new customers to the brand. In an exclusive interview with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich talks about his passion for designing, collecting and restoring motorcycles of all kinds. </p>
A look at the next 100 years
What will the motorcycle of the future look like?
<p>The 100th anniversary of the BMW Group is an opportunity to look back at the historic early days of the motorised two-wheeler and ahead to the future, where the role of the motorcycle will be completely redefined in an increasingly digital world.</p> <p>It's the 7th of March, 1916. Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (Bavarian Aircraft Works) begins operations on Lerchenauer Strasse in the north of Munich. Three years later, Zeno Diemer sets the world altitude record of 9,760 metres with the BMW IV six-cylinder inline aircraft engine.</p> <p>The small factory will later go on to reach new heights in other vehicle segments. Soon after changing its name to Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, the company begins developing the first motorcycle, long before it enters the automobile sector.</p>
The Great Escape
VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
<p>Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100. </p>
One fast Swede
Eva Håkansson holds the speed record with her homemade streamliner
<p>Fast can also be clean – Eva Håkansson is sure of this. The mechanical engineer with a doctorate wants to prove to the world that environmentally-friendly electric vehicles are fast and fun, and that mechanical engineering is an outstanding choice of profession for women. On the move with the fastest female motorcyclist in the world, who posted a new world record of 434 km/h with her homemade &quot;KillaJoule&quot; streamliner.</p>
Crafting a feeling
The BMW Motorrad design process
<p>Striking characters work in the BMW Motorrad design team. Every designer has their own style and feels at home in their own biker scene. And each and every one of them adds their own inspiration and passion. These different forms are then combined in the design process: they are manifested in each new BMW Motorrad creation. Edgar Heinrich, head designer at BMW Motorrad, introduces the BMW Motorrad design team and the design process. </p>
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